Domestic Abuse

The LGBT Domestic Abuse Project

The LGBT Domestic Abuse Project is funded through the Scottish Government’s Delivering Equally Safe fund.

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We work across Scotland to raise awareness of LGBTQ+ people’s experiences of domestic abuse and to support professionals and service providers to improve service responses to LGBTQ+ people. We do this through:

 

  • Awareness Raising
  • Research
  • Training
  • Policy work

 

To learn more about the LGBT Domestic Abuse Project, please contact Janice.Stevenson@lgbtyouth.org.uk.

Domestic Abuse in LGBTQ+ relationships

Abuse can happen to anyone, however there are some dynamics that can be different in LGBTQ+ relationships. 

 

To build services for our community, it’s important to understand what this can look like. For example:

 

  • Abusers may undermine the victim’s sexual orientation or gender identity as part of a pattern of emotional abuse.
  • Abusers may threaten to out them to others, to control them or keep them trapped in the relationship.
A speech bubble saying "voices unheard"

Voices Unheard

A group of LGBTQ+ young people focusing on domestic abuse and other forms of gender-based violence undertook an important peer consultation.

 

The report shows that LGBTQ+ young people in Scotland experience high rates of domestic abuse and face multiple barriers to accessing support or reporting abuse to the police.

 

It sets out key recommendations, developed in collaboration with LGBTQ+ young people.

Supporting LGBTQ+ people

Survivors may bring with them previous experiences of homophobia, biphobia and transphobia that create significant barriers to support. 

 

There are four things you can do to build an inclusive service. 

 

  1. Acknowledging that domestic abuse takes place within LGBTQ+ relationships.  Represent
  2. LGBTQ+ people in the language and images you use in promotional materials.
  3. Providing training and support for your staff to avoid assumptions about sexual orientation and gender identity. For example, use gender neutral terms like ‘partner’.
  4. Actively engage with LGBTQ+ communities. Make it clear that your service is for them! Chat to community members in your area to find out what their needs are. If your service is for women only, be clear that this includes trans women.

LGBT Charter

Sign up to our LGBT Charter programme to give your team access to a high quality programme ensuring your service is inclusive to LGBTQ+ people experiencing domestic abuse

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